Photographic Memories

Desert Rats

In the early days of photography, long before it came to be used for virtually every imaginable purpose, photography was largely used as a means of recording people and places. The world was largely “undiscovered” at the time (the western U.S. was still almost completely wild), and the camera was mostly used a matter of record-keeping (think of Eugene Atget’s thousands of determined studies of Paris or William Henry Jackson’s photographic revelations of the “new” American west). Despite the amazing number of uses for all sorts of imagery today, by and large, most of the billions of photographs snapped each year are still a means to record important places, people, and events in our lives. While I may call myself a fine art photographer, my motives behind my work are none too different than most point-n-shooters: I want to record subjects and moments that I want to remember. Photographs as memories – especially for the photographer – are incredibly powerful and can trigger deep and dormant thoughts and feelings.

Almost exactly one year ago today, I spent a week exploring and photographing The Maze District of Canyonlands National Park with two good friends, Guy Tal and Steve Cole. It was an amazing adventure, and not one that many will get to experience, and I shared it with two dear friends. I could have written journals about our adventures; I could daydream incessantly about the things we did and saw; but a quick look at the photographs instantly transports me back to that very special place and time. Only the photographer can have this deep-seated connection to his or her images, and it’s a pretty damn powerful feeling.

You are visiting the blog of fine art photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website.

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SOLD: Ebony SV45Ti 4×5″ Large Format View Camera

Sorry, but this camera has been SOLD.

side view

I can see it now as I type: some will be rushing to this post to see if Michael Gordon has given up large format and “gone digital”. Nope! The Chamonix 045-N has become my view

front standard

camera of choice, and I’ve just acquired a second one as backup. The Ebony has been hiding in my closet since my first Chamonix acquisition (which was serial #92), so it’s time to let it go to someone who will put it to use. If you’re here looking at this posting, you’re probably already know that Ebony cameras are sought after and amongst the finest. So sought after that they’re very difficult to find on the used market. That is, until right now.

back standard, includes Ebony fresnel lens

You can get all the specs on the SV45Ti from Ebony’s site. Needless to say, in the Ebony 4×5″ camera lineup, the SV45Ti is only second from top of the line (the two SV45U models feature assymetrical movements; otherwise, this one can do it all!). It’s a full-featured camera built for a lifetime of use and enjoyment. This camera retails new for $2645-2845 USD depending upon dealer. The camera is USED in the classical sense. It is light-leak free and undamaged, but it has clearly visible signs of use.

bellows close-up

The photographs here are of the actual camera for sale. In the interest of full disclosure, the only ‘weakness’ to this camera is the aging bellows. Some wrinkles are visible and the pleats are no longer perfect (hey, I said the camera was used!) but to repeat, they are currently light-leak free.

bottom/mounting plate


I am asking for $1750 (plus actual shipping costs) for this camera
. If you are interested, please contact me via email. I can supply additional detailed snapshots of the camera if necessary. Thanks for looking!

You are visiting the blog of fine art photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website.

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Aerial Photography

William GarnettI’ve been a National Geographic reader since I was a youngster, and I’ve always been terribly fascinated by the aerial photographs found within its pages. I never did learn how to fly (nor have I tried), and although I took up mountaineering and rock climbing, the view and feel just isn’t quite the same.

Although aerial photography is considerably easier to execute today than in the earlier days of the medium (better and more well-suited photographic equipment; alternative flight forms [ultralight’s, for instance], it is still a form of photography practiced largely by private pilots, assignment photographers (those whose flights are generally paid for), and the wealthy. It’s reasonably impractical for most other photographers who are pursuing ‘personal work’ to hire flights – it’s just too prohibitively expensive.

Herein is a very short list of aerial photographers whose work greatly inspires me:

Bradford Washburn: mountain climber, explorer, cartographer, pilot, photographer, honorary doctor, museum director – wow! An amazing and accomplished man. His aerial work was done with 5×7″ and 8×10″ large format cameras! See some of his work here . Learn about him here. Books by or about him and his photography.

William Garnett: an amazing eye for the abstract. Another private pilot. Learn about him here. Books. His work in Aerial Photographs is positively sublime.

Alex MacLean: has an excellent eye for form, design, and color. Yet another private pilot (seeing any trends?). His website. Books.

Enjoy!

You are visiting the blog of fine art photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website.