Immense, Silent, and Sacred

I have released a beautiful 46-page 8″x8″ softcover book containing eighteen of my photographs exhibited during The National Park Service:100 Years-California Dreaming exhibition at the Viewpoint Photographic Art Center in Sacramento, California. These eighteen images span many years of my work in Death Valley National Park and Joshua Tree National Park.

Books purchased through my website are signed/autographed. Immense, Silent, and Sacred can be fully previewed at MagCloud. Please note than purchases through MagCloud are unsigned/not autographed. Digital downloads are also available.

It has never been easier or less expensive to own my photographs in print form (that’s a little more than $1 per photo). Many thanks in advance for your support and purchases!

You are visiting the blog of fine art landscape photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website. You can also find Michael

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The National Park Service—100 Years: California Dreaming

CaptureI am very pleased to announce my next big exhibition: The National Park Service—100 Years: California Dreaming at the Viewpoint Photographic Art Center in Sacramento, California. This exhibition opens on August 10, 2016 and runs through September 3, 2016. I will be exhibiting 15-20 photographic prints from Death Valley National Park and Joshua Tree National Park in celebration of the Centennial of our National Park Service.

I hope that you will join me for the Opening Reception at the Viewpoint on Saturday, Aug. 13 from 5:00 pm to 9:00 pm. Please visit the Viewpoint Photographic Art Center website for more information.

You are visiting the blog of fine art landscape photographer Michael E. Gordon. For information and photographs, please visit his official website. You can also find Michael on Facebook.

Desert Portraits

Riz Orkestra

Riz Orkestra

I had great fun on Monday making portraits for two longtime creative friends. D.R. Lunsford (Douglas) will soon publish his first collection of short stories featuring one of my portraits on the cover (I’m looking forward to reading it, Doug!). ‘Riz Orkestra is an amazing self-described “one-man-folk-roots-blues-band” who will hopefully soon be releasing another CD (we listened to fresh takes while driving) and I hope he’ll consider using my portrait of him. This article describes Riz as a musical “savant” – check him jamming on the Dobro, beautifully soloing on a Steinway, tearing it up on the vibraphone, and grooving on the blues slide guitar – Riz has immense talent. I’ve known him for

D.R. Lunsford

D.R. Lunsford

more than 20 years and he is one of the most gifted musicians (and people) I’ve listened to and with whom I have had the opportunity to jam with, record with, and photograph. Riz is The Master.

Doug’s portrait was made mid-day at Thousand Palms Oasis in Coachella Valley and Riz’s was made in Joshua Tree National Park near dusk. I used a single strobe, light stand, and umbrella for both. Enjoy, and please keep an eye out for D.R.’s book and Riz’s CD.

You are visiting the blog of fine art landscape photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website. You can also find Michael on FacebookGoogle+, and  Twitter.

Photograph: Sliver

Late afternoon canyon light illuminates a rocky outcrop of California Barrel Cactus (Ferocactus cylindraceus). Joshua Tree National Park, California.

You are visiting the blog of fine art landscape photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website. You can also find Michael on TwitterFacebook, and Google+.

‘Introduction to Large Format Photography’ with the Julia Dean Photo Workshops: March 2011

I’m excited to announce that I’ll be teaching my next Introduction to Large Format Photography group workshop in March 2011 with the Julia Dean Photo Workshops! The Julia Dean Photo Workshops (JDPW) is the West Coast’s largest and most practical education school of photography devoted to advancing the skills and increasing the personal enrichment of photographers of all experience levels and ages. They offer nearly 170 workshops per year, programming a variety of community events, and supporting artists through group and one-person gallery exhibits. In addition, JDPW offers workshops with and provides access to some of the most well-known and respected photographers in the world, including: Greg Gorman, Duane Michals, Mary Ellen Mark, Sam Abell, Douglas Kirkland, David Alan Harvey, Keith Carter, Phil Borges, Bruce Davidson, John Paul Caponigro, Alex Webb, Ron Haviv, James Nachtwey and more. It goes without saying that I’m very excited to have my name listed as an Instructor amongst these incredible photographer/teacher luminaries.

As the West Coast’s largest non-degree based school of photography, JDPW offers a broad range of coursework, with classes ranging from photojournalism and fine art photography to studio photography and portraiture. For students looking to become more involved in the photographic community, JDPW also provides yearly Membership Plans which provide numerous perks and benefits, such as: discounts on tuition, free admittance to events and guest lectures, credit towards a travel workshop and more.

My next Introduction to Large Format Photography workshop will be held at Joshua Tree National Park on March 12-13, 2011. For more information and registration, please see the JDPW website listing. Please let me know if you have any questions about this workshop. I hope to see you in Joshua Tree NP!

You are visiting the blog of fine art photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website.

2010 California Desert Wildflower Prognostications

Ocotillo and Arizon Lupine. Colorado Desert, California

Despite the copious amounts of rain and snow that have fallen on California’s deserts since late November 2009, the 2010 desert wildflower season (if there is to be one) is off to a rather poor start. The attached photograph was made on March 9, 2008. If I were to take you to this location today, we would find nothing like the sweep of Arizona Lupine we see surrounding these Ocotillo. In fact, as of a few days ago, flower-less was this location and many others that are typically in flower at this time. Many high desert residents have delayed their spring gardening, as winter has hung around for as much as one month longer than in most years. The continued precipitation, cold, and wind has done little to encourage growth. Regardless, close inspection of the ground, plants, and buds reveals what may be an underwhelming bloom, despite all this rain!

I initially had scheduled a Desert Wildflower Photography Tour for March 6. I would have typically counted on this date, but on March 6 of 2010, there was virtually nothing in flower. So I postponed the Tour until March 20. I have spent recent days in the locations I had planned to take the tour, but because most of these locations are tremendously late and possibly altogether flower-less this spring, I have canceled any plans for a Desert Wildflower Tour.

I concluded a private workshop last Sunday in Anza-Borrego Desert State Park. As Ron Niebrugge and Phil Colla have already reported, Sahara Mustard (Brassica tournefortii) has radically altered the Borrego Valley landscape, stretching from Borrego Springs all the way to Salton Sea. I even found it in remote canyons and washes during my stay. Unfortunately, the spread of this plant is out of control, with millions of acres of Colorado and Sonoran Desert having already been transformed, and with many more acres at risk from this noxious and invasive species. I’ll, too, join the choir in declaring that the vast fields of wildflowers that made Borrego Valley famous may now be a thing of the past. The only real solution at this time is hand-pulling, which is not terribly effective when thousands of acres have been inundated with this devil weed. You can help! If you spot Sahara Mustard while in the field, KILL IT! The entire plant – roots and all – must be pulled, placed in a tied-off plastic bag, and properly disposed of. Simply pulling the plant and tossing it aside is not enough, as the seeds can and will still disperse from a pulled plant.

There is a possibility that things could flip quickly, as we are finally experiencing spring-like conditions throughout most of the California desert for the next week or so. Should I find a remarkable transformation out there, I may offer a short-notice one day tour. Barring this, I am currently at work on putting together a late March/early April 2010 trip to southern Death Valley’s stunning Owlshead Mountains. Only there can I guarantee spreads of wildflowers, towering sand dunes, and vast and stunning landscapes. Click here for more information about this tour.

You are visiting the blog of fine art photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website.

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Great News for Joshua Tree National Park!

a hiker views the Joshua Tree National Park landscape of Rattlesnake Canyon

Joshua Tree National Park

The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday upheld a lower court’s rejection of a plan — 20 years in the making — that sought to turn a former iron ore mine near Joshua Tree National Park into the “largest landfill in the United States,” according to the decision.

Tuesday’s ruling was a setback for proponents of the controversial Eagle Mountain Landfill, who say it would bring much-needed jobs and revenue to the Coachella Valley and the surrounding region.

But landfill opponents called Tuesday’s ruling a “landmark victory” for the animals who call the national park home and the more than 1.3 million people who visit the park every year.

The appellate court’s 2-1 decision upheld a 2005 district court decision that overturned the land exchange needed for the 4,654-acre Eagle Mountain Landfill, which was proposed for a former iron ore mine near Joshua Tree National Park.

“Thank God this thing is over; it’s been going on for more than 20 years,” said Eagle Mountain resident Donna Charpied, who lives two miles from the proposed site with her husband, Larry. “It’s time for the government to stop with this nonsense.”

Read the rest of this story at The Desert Sun website.

You are visiting the blog of fine art photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website.

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