The Greatest Dog There Ever Was

Mojave2On January 23, 2018, we so sadly said goodbye to our sweet girl, Mojave, as she took her last breath in my arms. We have been devastated by her passing. The days have been long and the nights short ever since. If you knew her, you loved her – she left you with no other option. I was forever changed by her more than thirteen years ago when I found her wandering in the Mojave Desert, another canine victim of a lousy human. Another man’s trash was this man’s treasure.

For more than thirteen years my girl was at my side. It didn’t matter where or what we were doing, she was happiest just being with mom and dad. We called ourselves The Unit – Shauna, me, and Mojave. She made our lives happy and complete. And we find ourselves struggling to move forward without her.

People like us are not easy to console. To be sure, there are millions of dogs who need adoption and homes. And we provide the best home and life imaginable for our animals. But there was only one Mojave. She cannot be replaced. Her spirit will never die and there will not be a single day ahead where I don’t shed tears longing to hold her tight and kiss her again.

I love you forever, my sweet girl. I’ll see you again on the other side of the Rainbow Bridge.

You are visiting the blog of fine art landscape photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website. You can also find Michael on Facebook.

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Slashed Canyon

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Just one of many of Death Valley National’s Park incredibly twisted and narrow limestone canyons. This one found in the Grapevine Mountains, its inner beauty secluded by the challenging scrambling and climbing required to reach this point.

You are visiting the blog of fine art landscape photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website. You can also find Michael on Facebook.

Mojave Desert Boondoggles: The Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project

Cadiz

“…the voice of the desert is the one which has been least often heard.
We came to it last, and when we did come,
we came principally to exploit rather than to listen.
Joseph Wood Krutch

It’s long been acknowledged that the Mojave Desert provides the most ideal location for our prisons, landfills, renewable energy plants, military installations, military bombing ranges, and royalty-free access to minerals and water. In what other ways could man possibly benefit from the realm of desert bighorn sheep, seasonal wildflower blooms, desert tortoises, and wild desert springs? Unfortunately, this is the traditionally held [ignorant] view of and behavior toward the the California desert and its “resources”.

Bonanza

THREATENED: Bonanza Spring and the Clipper Mountains

The publicly-traded company Cadiz, Inc.  grows citrus and avocados on its 45,000 acres of privately held desert land in Cadiz Valley (water intensive farming in the desert?). Cadiz proposes to mine 50,000 acre-feet of groundwater (shared) every year from beneath Cadiz Valley while claiming that pumping from the basin would not affect Bonanza Spring (seen in the attached photos), or any other springs in the adjacent Mojave Trails National Monument or the Mojave National Preserve to the north. U.S. Geological Survey geologists assert that only 5,000 to 6,000 acre-feet per year of recharge is possible (this is, after all, the driest desert in North America). It’s simple math: drawdown will exceed recharge (Never Forget: Owens Valley and the LADWP). For nearly two decades, Cadiz, Inc. has tried to advance their project and for nearly two decades it has failed. Why?

“Access to new water supplies is extremely critical to the continued vitality of our cities,” says California Senator Tony Cárdenas in a promotional document defending Cadiz. But will a private water sale to one county benefiting a mere 400,000 people offer relief to a metropolitan area of 13 million? Cárdenas falls right in line with those who believe that coastal cities can sustain infinite growth (“vitality”) without an adequate local water supply. It is both illogical and irrational for a coastal city to suggest that it requires desert water for its “vitality”.

The California desert conservation community has been successful repeatedly at beating the bullsh*t served up by Cadiz; forward movement has been blocked again and again. That is, until the nightmare 45th President of the United States moved into the White House. Why would POTUS have an interest in the remote California desert and in a water project that serves less than half a million? Why would this unremarkable water project on the remote Mojave Desert make Donald’s Top 50 Priority List of Emergency and National Security Projects? Why, follow that money trail!

In late July, the 45th Administration confirmed David Bernhardt, a highly controversial pick, for the Number 2 post at the Department of the Interior:

“Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) called on David Bernhardt, President Trump’s nominee for Deputy Secretary of the Interior, to recuse himself from all matters concerning the Cadiz water extraction project. Bernhardt is currently the head of the natural resources division at Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, the lobbying firm that is representing Cadiz.” “Given the fact that your current firm, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, LLP, is contracted to lobby on behalf of Cadiz, Inc., I remain deeply concerned about any potential conflict of interest should you serve as Deputy Secretary of the Department of the Interior—the agency responsible for oversight of the federal lands related to the Cadiz proposal,” Senator Feinstein wrote.”

You read this correctly: David Bernhardt represents one of the most egregious conflicts of interest arising from this Administration.

With your help we will protect the Mojave Desert and stop The Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project because it is so wrong on so many levels. If , as the proponents suggest, the project is good and necessary, then why has it been so hotly contested and written about? Several hours worth of reading and viewing can be found in the numerous links provided below.

Protect and preserve Your Mojave Desert – thank you for reading and opposing this damaging and dirty project. #RememberOwensValley #CadizSUCKS

MORE INFORMATION:

STUDY: CADIZ WATER PROJECT SCIENCE UNRELIABLE, WOULD JEOPARDIZE DESERT SPRINGS

Feinstein Slams Decision to Kill Cadiz Bill in State Senate

Cadiz Inc.’s pipe dream to drain a California desert spring

The Cadiz Pipeline (audio: jump to 8:05)

Loan to Jared Kushner raises questions about California water project

Study shows Cadiz water project would threaten spring in national monument

Cadiz project’s harm wouldn’t be limited to the desert

The Trouble with Cadiz

Environmental groups sue Trump administration over California desert groundwater project

A Controversial Plan to Drain Water From the Desert? Go for It, Trump Administration Says

Federal policy change criticized for giving ‘free pass’ to controversial desert water project

Forget it, Jake: It’s Cadiz

Will Cadiz Project Drain Desert Aquifers?

The Cadiz water scheme: How political juice kept a bad idea alive for years

The ludicrous plan to pump Mojave water to L.A.

Opinion: AB 1000 Would Protect California’s Deserts From Trump

The scheme to pump desert water to L.A. could destroy the Mojave. California’s Legislature needs to block it

WATER IS PRECIOUS IN THE DESERT. SPEAK UP TO PROTECT IT.

Cadiz Water Project should be nixed

TAKE ACTION: Protect California’s Precious Desert Water Resources!

State Legislation Introduced to Protect Water Resources, National Parks and Public Lands in California Desert

Cadiz: The Desert Water Pimps

Interior head says public lands can make U.S. a ‘dominant’ oil power

Secretary Zinke’s Magic-8-Ball approach to policy making

Trump eases the way for a controversial water pumping project in a California desert

Mojave Desert Feinstein asks Trump administration to protect desert water

Cadiz Inc. would harm the Mohave. Here’s how

Cook: Orange County Water District Should Distance Itself from the Cadiz Water Project

Feinstein to Zinke: Don’t Let Cadiz Destroy Pristine Desert

The Absurdity of the Cadiz Water Export Scheme

Feinstein: Trump Nominee Should Recuse Himself from Cadiz Water Project

Water extraction project would be destructive to California’s Mojave Desert

Desert Water Project Would Threaten Tribes’ Sacred Lands

How you can tell Trump cares nothing about water: He’s supporting the ridiculous Cadiz project

National monument boundaries protect our heritage: Guest commentary

Protect the Groundwater Beneath Our National Treasures

Trump’s pick for a top Interior post has sued the agency on behalf of powerful California water interests

You are visiting the blog of fine art landscape photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website. You can also find Michael on Facebook.

Joshua Tree National Park Art Exposition: September 16-17, 2017

ExpoThe Joshua Tree National Park Art Exposition at the historic Oasis of Mara in Twentynine Palms, CA, presents a juried art exhibition, opening reception and awards, art market, artist booths, art classes, nature walks, historical lectures and exhibits, live music, and culinary treats. Events are staged at five cultural venues in the Oasis of Mara: 29 Palms Art Gallery, 29 Palms Inn, 29 Palms Creative Center & Gallery, Old Schoolhouse Museum, and Joshua Tree National Park HQ & Oasis Visitor Center on National Park Drive. This art exhibition and celebration features art inspired by or depicting the unique natural beauty or cultural history of Joshua Tree National Park.

I hope you’ll join me for a weekend of desert art on September 16-17, 2017. You’ll find me both days at the Art Market on the Lawn from 10am to 4pm showing mine. You might also consider joining us for the Artist Reception on Saturday, September 16 from 5-8pm at the 29 Palms Art Gallery. Lots of outstanding art (63 artists in total) is found in this year’s expo and you deserve to see it.

For more information, maps, etc.:
Joshua Tree National Park Art Exposition website

Event Venue Map (PDF)

Schedule of Events (PDF)

See you in 29 Palms on September 16-17!

You are visiting the blog of fine art landscape photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website. You can also find Michael on Facebook.

The Exciting Monsoon Season opens soon on a desert near you!

Weather does not happen. It is the visible manifestation of
the Spirit moving itself in the void.
” Mary Hunter Austin

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Cloud shadows on the Cottonwood Mountains, Death Valley National Park

You are visiting the blog of fine art landscape photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website. You can also find Michael on Facebook.

Preserving Public Lands with Photographs

GC163The National Parks Conservation Association invited me to Washington D.C. last week to lobby on behalf of OUR public lands, our National Monuments, the Mojave Desert, and the $12 billion National Park Service maintenance backlog. Although we had an appointment with Senator Feinstein’s, staff, on Tuesday morning I had the unexpected opportunity to directly offer my thanks to California Senator Dianne Feinstein for all that she has done for conservation (especially on my Mojave Desert) in the great state of California. Senator Feinstein championed three of our newest National Monuments (Sand to Snow, Mojave Trails, and Castle Mountains) and I gifted her with a framed print of Castle Mountains National Monument. She was departing office and quickly heading towards the Capitol for a vote but very graciously spared me her time. Her face seemed to light up when I held up the piece for her. I dared not ask for a photo – I was shocked when she wanted one (with her own iPhone!). She loved the photograph and frame. She could have quickly blown me off and directed me to her staff but that did not happen. What a gracious lady and champion of our state. THANK YOU, Senator Feinstein!

Regarding the NPS Maintenance backlog (aka National Park Service Legacy Act of 2017): Please contact your Senators today and ask them to co-sponsor S.751. Next, contact your Representatives and ask them to co-sponsor H.R.2584 (the House companion bill to S.751).

Finally, if you have yet to send in your comments regarding the current Administration’s “review” of our National Monuments, please do so TODAY (deadline is July 10, 2017). Tell the Department of Interior that you do not want your Monuments altered in any fashion and that your National Monuments (in their current state) are not available for commercial energy interests (the real reason behind this “review”). Comments from others can be viewed on the right side of the page and can be helpful in drafting your own words. Many THANKS for taking action on behalf of our extraordinary public lands!

My sincere THANKS to David Lamfrom and Emily Douce of National Parks Conservation Association for making possible my lobbying day and the meeting with Senator Dianne Feinstein.

You are visiting the blog of fine art landscape photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website. You can also find Michael on Facebook.

When the going gets tough, the tough go hiking

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I’ve been particularly neglectful of this blog for a long time and this likely is not the first time that I’ve said that here. So let me say it again: I intend to rejuvenate this blog and begin posting more photographs to it (with or without many accompanying words). Business and life keep me scrambling and busy and social media (namely Facebook) has become my standard way to share and disseminate ideas, links, photographs, and content. While Facebook is fast and easy and posts there tend to draw many more eyes, that’s not a good reason to back off here on my own platform. My archive houses tens of thousands of images and I plan to start popping them on here. I hope you’ll stay tuned. Thanks for being here with me.

Photograph: two photographer/hikers walk up a remote canyon in Death Valley National Park.

You are visiting the blog of fine art landscape photographer Michael E. Gordon. For additional photos and information, please visit his official website. You can also find Michael